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Portion Control was the Key

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When Ed walked into Dietician Doris Pezzotti’s office at Tuality Healthcare, their discussion on portion control stuck with him. This concept guided him through his weight-loss goals and his journey to control his Type 2 Diabetes.

Ed initially met Doris in September 2016 and has drastically changed his diet, incorporated an exercise routine, and lowered his blood sugar levels.

“I really cliqued with portion control,” Ed said. “It’s about being aware of what you are eating.”

Ed explained to Pezzotti that he didn’t want to be on a diet, but rather eat regular foods. In addition to portion control, she recommended removing sugary foods from his diet and incorporating exercise into his daily routine.

Ed started paying attention to food portions and reduced his meal sizes. He also purchased a Fitbit to track the mileage he walked daily, which went from under a mile a day to almost three. Walking has increased his energy levels and reduced pain in his knees.

He also has changed his diet to include healthier foods such as fruits and vegetables. “I used to have a bowl of sugary cereal in the morning every day,” Ed said. “Now I eat lots of raw vegetables and salads, and a half a cup of mixed nuts daily, which the protein helps me get my day started.”

Prior to Ed’s diet and exercise transformation he weighed 382 pounds. He now weighs 328 pounds and pays closer attention to portion sizes and the kind of food he eats. Pezzotti explained that Ed’s body wasn’t using insulin efficiently, but now it is, and his blood sugar is back to normal.

“Exercise was important because the increased circulation helped with his insulin issues,” Pezzotti said. “Part of the issue was his high calorie diet and low activity levels.”

A third of all Americans born in 2000 will get diabetes. According to the Oregon Health Authority, the rise in diabetes has mirrored the increase in obesity rates in the United States. Diabetes also costs 3 billion annually in medical expenditures and lost productivity.


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